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Michel de Montaigne Quotes:

My life has been full of terrible misfortunes most of which never happened.

Michel de Montaigne

A good marriage would be between a blind wife and a deaf husband.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

He who establishes his argument by noise and command shows that his reason is weak.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

There is no conversation more boring than the one where everybody agrees.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

It is good to rub and polish our brain against that of others.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

There are some defeats more triumphant than victories.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Lend yourself to others, but give yourself to yourself.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Valor is stability, not of legs and arms, but of courage and the soul.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Those who have compared our life to a dream were right… we were sleeping wake, and waking sleep.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

I prefer the company of peasants because they have not been educated sufficiently to reason incorrectly.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Not being able to govern events, I govern myself.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Rejoice in the things that are present; all else is beyond thee.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

If you press me to say why I loved him, I can say no more than because he was he, and I was I.

Marriage, a market which has nothing free but the entrance.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

I quote others only in order the better to express myself.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

I know well what I am fleeing from but not what I am in search of.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

I care not so much what I am to others as what I am to myself. I will be rich by myself, and not by borrowing.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Death, they say, acquits us of all obligations.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

If you don’t know how to die, don’t worry; Nature will tell you what to do on the spot, fully and adequately. She will do this job perfectly for you; don’t bother your head about it.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Confidence in the goodness of another is good proof of one’s own goodness.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

I do myself a greater injury in lying than I do him of whom I tell a lie.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

One may be humble out of pride.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

‘Tis the sharpness of our mind that gives the edge to our pains and pleasures.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

It is the mind that maketh good or ill, That maketh wretch or happy, rich or poor.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

My trade and art is to live.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

The world is but a perpetual see-saw.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

My life has been full of terrible misfortunes most of which never happened.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

A good marriage would be between a blind wife and a deaf husband.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

He who establishes his argument by noise and command shows that his reason is weak.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

There is no conversation more boring than the one where everybody agrees.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

It is good to rub and polish our brain against that of others.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

It is good to rub and polish our brain against that of others.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Lend yourself to others, but give yourself to yourself.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Valor is stability, not of legs and arms, but of courage and the soul.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Those who have compared our life to a dream were right… we were sleeping wake, and waking sleep.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

I prefer the company of peasants because they have not been educated sufficiently to reason incorrectly.

Not being able to govern events, I govern myself.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Rejoice in the things that are present; all else is beyond thee.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

If you press me to say why I loved him, I can say no more than because he was he, and I was I.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Marriage, a market which has nothing free but the entrance.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

I quote others only in order the better to express myself.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

I know well what I am fleeing from but not what I am in search of.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

I care not so much what I am to others as what I am to myself. I will be rich by myself, and not by borrowing.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Death, they say, acquits us of all obligations.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

If you don’t know how to die, don’t worry; Nature will tell you what to do on the spot, fully and adequately. She will do this job perfectly for you; don’t bother your head about it.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Confidence in the goodness of another is good proof of one’s own goodness.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

I do myself a greater injury in lying than I do him of whom I tell a lie.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

One may be humble out of pride.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

‘Tis the sharpness of our mind that gives the edge to our pains and pleasures.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

It is the mind that maketh good or ill, That maketh wretch or happy, rich or poor.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

My trade and art is to live.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

The world is but a perpetual see-saw.

MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

Who is Michel de Montaigne ?

28 February 1533-13 September 1592, was one of the most influential French renaissance philosopher, known for his popularization as a literary genre.

His job is noted for its mix of casual and academic anecdotes and autobiography. His volume, Essais, contains some of the most important essays ever published.

Montaigne had direct impact on the Western writers of Francis Bacon, René Descartes, Blaise Pascal, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Virginia Woolf, Albert Hirschman, William Hazlitt and possibly on William Shakespeare’s later works, including those by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Friedrich Nietzsche, Stefan Zweig, Eric Hoffer, Isaac Asimov.

Montaigne was revered during his lifetime as a statesman rather than an author. His writings on observations and personal ruminations seemed to damage proper style rather than creativity, and his assertion that “I’m myself the problem of my writing” was regarded as self-indulgent by his contemporaries.

In time, however, Montaigne was recognized as a spirit of free entertainment, perhaps better than any other author of his time, that began to emerge.

He is most famous for his cynical comment, “Que sçay-je?” (“What do I say, inMiddle French; now rendered in Modern French as Que sais-je?).