John Keats Quotes About Love, Beauty, poetry, Life

John Keats Quotes About Love, Beauty, poetry, Life

John Keats (31 October 1795-23 February 1821) was a Romantic poet from England. He was one of the leading figures in the second generation of Romantic poets, along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, despite having published his works at the age of 25 just four years before his death from tuberculosis. Although his poems during his lifetime were generally not well received by critics, his reputation grew after his death, and by the end of the 19th century he had become one of the most beloved of all English poets. He had a huge influence on a diverse variety of poets and authors. Jorge Luis Borges claimed that the most important literary experience of his life was his first contact with Keats' work. Keats' poetry is characterized by sensual imagery, in the sequence of odes most notably. This is characteristic of romantic poets, as they were aimed at accentuating intense emotion through a reliance on natural imagery. Today his poems and letters are among the most famous in English literature and are most analyzed. Some of Keats' most celebrated plays are "Ode to a Nightingale," "Sleep and Poetry" and the famous sonnet "On First Looking into the Homer of Chapman"

You are always new, the last of your kisses was ever the sweetest.

John Keats

The excellency of every art is its intensity, capable of making all disagreeable evaporate.

John Keats

I love you the more in that I believe you had liked me for my own sake and for nothing else.

John Keats

With a great poet the sense of Beauty overcomes every other consideration, or rather obliterates all consideration.

John Keats

There is not a fiercer hell than the failure in a great object.

John Keats

I have two luxuries to brood over in my walks, your loveliness and the hour of my death. O that I could have possession of them both in the same minute.

John Keats

Though a quarrel in the streets is a thing to be hated, the energies displayed in it are fine; the commonest man shows a grace in his quarrel.

John Keats

I will give you a definition of a proud man: he is a man who has neither vanity nor wisdom one filled with hatreds cannot be vain, neither can he be wise.

John Keats

You speak of Lord Byron and me; there is this great difference between us. He describes what he sees I describe what I imagine. Mine is the hardest task.

John Keats

The Public – a thing I cannot help looking upon as an enemy, and which I cannot address without feelings of hostility.

John Keats
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